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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

1 edition of Case Marking in Natural Languages (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics) found in the catalog.

Case Marking in Natural Languages (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics)

Joan Maling

Case Marking in Natural Languages (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics)

by Joan Maling

  • 340 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Language Arts & Disciplines,
  • Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics,
  • Linguistics

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7764860M
    ISBN 100521819067
    ISBN 109780521819060

    represented by languages with no morphological case marking whatsoever, while, at the other extreme, one finds languages with extremely rich case systems, such as Uralic, Dravidian, or Nakh-Dagestanian. Iggesen () finds the distribution of morphological cases shown in .   Case-Marking Strategies Case-Marking Strategies de Hoop, Helen; Malchukov, Andrej L. Case-Marking Strategies Helen de Hoop Andrej L. Malchukov Two strategies of case marking in natural languages are discussed. These are defined as two violable constraints whose effects are shown to converge in the case of differential object marking but diverge in the case of .

    2 In Korean the domain of grammatical case assignment extends not only to arguments, but also to a range of adverbials. For example, in (1) we see the durational adverbial twu sikan ‘two hours’ marked with the accusative case marker -(l)ul.1 (1) Haksayng-tul-i chayk-ul twu sikan-ul t-PL-NOM book-ACC two hours-ACC read-PAST-DECL2.   Problems with grammatical morphology are widely documented in children with specific language impairment (SLI) in many languages attention has been devoted to examining problems with verb morphology, especially with tense and agreement morphemes, and there are studies on the grammatical encoding of aspect as well (e.g., Fletcher, Leonard, Wong, & Stokes, ).

    Differential case-marking in Hindi / Helen de Hoop and Bhuvana Narasimhan. Competition and variation in natural languages: the case for case. Some participants are more equal than others: Case and the composition of arguments in Kuuk Thaayorre. Head marking and dependent marking of grammatical relations in Yurakař. What is Case Markings? Definition of Case Markings: Languages such as Russian, French or German use an inventory of grammatical cases to mark certain grammatical functions in a sentence, such as the subject (“doer of an action”/nominative, object/accusative or “receiver of an action”/dative). In English, only the genitive case (Mary’s friend) explicitly is marked.


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Case Marking in Natural Languages (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics) by Joan Maling Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Case" is a linguistics term regarding a manner of categorizing nouns, pronouns, adjectives, participles, and numerals according to their traditionally corresponding grammatical functions within a given phrase, clause, or some languages, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, determiners, participles, prepositions, numerals, articles and their modifiers take different inflected forms.

Publisher Summary. This chapter deals with competition and variation among cases and case-marking devices in natural languages. A simple division of case-realizing languages into nominative-accusative and ergative-absolutive is insufficient. It is possible for a language not to mark case on noun phrases at all – in those languages you might view all three NPs as being marked the same way.

Nominative-Accusative The subjects of transitive and intransitive verbs are marked one way; the object of a transitive verb is marked another. Example: Maricopa. sny’aknysh ashvark. Case-Marking.

This is generally accomplished in natural language by case-marking, which marks. roles. of noun-phrases. in respect to verbs and other function-like expressions. Case-marking is implemented in various languages, in various ways including word-order inflection adposition.

the latter of which includes. pre-position post File Size: KB. From the reviews: “This book originates from a workshop on ‘Differential Subject Marking’ held in Nijmegen. chapters address DSM phenomena in particular languages.

This collection of articles succeeds in advancing our understanding of DSM and the factors that determine it. Format: Hardcover. Chapter 9 Changes in Case Marking in NP: From Old English to Middle English Cynthia L.

Allen 1. Introduction I Two major questions that have been discussed in the extensive recent literature concerning case marking from a synchronic point of view are: (1) What types of case-marking systems are found in human languages, and how can we explain the apparent non-existence of some conceivable types.

In Case, Mark Baker develops a unified theory of how the morphological case marking of noun phrases is determined by syntactic structure. Designed to work well for languages of all alignment types - accusative, ergative, tripartite, marked nominative, or marked absolutive - this theory has been developed and tested against unrelated languages of each type, and more than twenty non-Indo.

The aim of this dovetailed approach is to demonstrate that the grammaticalization pathways and functions of agentive marking observed in natural languages are replicated by the grammaticalization of case marking in the artificial language of the computer simulation, and to show that the findings have theoretical implications for our.

Essive-modal case: marking a condition as a quality (a way of being) as a house Hungarian: Exessive case: marking a transition from a condition: from being a house (i.e., "it stops being a house") Estonian (rare) | Finnish (dialectal) Formal case: marking a condition as a quality: as a house Hungarian: Identical case: showing that something is.

Two strategies of case marking in natural languages are discussed. These are defined as two violable constraints whose effects are shown to converge in the case of differential object marking but diverge in the case of differential subject marking.

Differential argument marking (DAM) is a cover term for when languages encode the same grammatical function (e.g. subject or object) in different ways. It includes non-uniform encoding of arguments in terms of case marking, but also in terms of the presence or absence of agreement on the verb.

The term differential marking – specifically differential object marking or DOM – was coined by. Case is a category of marking dependent noun phrases for the type of relationship they bear to their heads.

The three phenomena that are clearly determined by case functions in many languages are explored: phonological realization, selection, and agreement. A brief overview of influential approaches that offer an explanation for the CH and the constraints is provided.

12 Case-Marking Strategies 13 14 Helen de Hoop 15 Andrej L. Malchukov 16 17 Two strategies of case marking in natural languages are discussed. 18 These are defined as two violable constraints whose effects are shown 19 to converge in the case of differential object marking but diverge in 20 the case of differential subject marking.

The. “What is the language with least grammatical cases. Either Indo-European, Austronesian, or Afro-Asiatic” Indo-European: In Indo-European languages many Western-most ones have only cases in the pronouns. Examples include English, French, Dutch, Swe. Two strategies of case marking in natural languages are discussed.

These are defined as two violable constraints whose effects are shown to converge in the case of differential object marking but. Altogether in the WALS sample of language, the largest number — 37 languages — exhibit a 6- or 7-way case system. Languages with 8- or 9-case systems are rarer and include Burushaski, Burmese (a relative of Mandarin Chinese, which has no case marking at all), Japanese and Yidiny (a close relative of the above-mentioned Dyirbal).

Abstract. Two strategies of case marking in natural languages are discussed. These are defined as two violable constraints whose effects are shown to converge in the case of differential object marking but diverge in the case of differential subject marking.

When it ma nifests, core case marking in both the natural and artificial languages appears to be initially motivated by the same fundamental need to disambiguate semantic roles.

In other words. This item appears in the following Collection(s) Faculty of Arts []; Electronic publications [] Freely accessible full text publications plus those not yet available due to embargo. Case-Marking Strategies Helen de Hoop Andrej L. Malchukov Two strategies of case marking in natural languages are discussed.

These are defined as two violable constraints whose effects are shown to converge in the case of differential object marking but diverge in the case of differential subject marking.

The discourse prominence of. Competition and variation in natural languages: the case for case. (M. Amberber, H. de Hoop). Some participants are more equal than others: Case and the composition of arguments in Kuuk Thaayorre.

(A. Gaby). Head marking and dependent marking of grammatical relations in Yurakaré. (R. van Gijn).Competition and variation in natural languages: the case for case / Mengistu Amberber and Helen de Hoop --Some participants are more equal than others: case and the composition of arguments in Kuuk Thaayorre / Alice Gaby --Head marking and dependent marking of grammatical relations in Yurakaré / Rik van Gijn --Case pattern splits, verb types.Above, the word order doesn't change, but notice that the case marking on the subject of (29d) is dative case marking, just like the case marking on the indirect object of (29e).

This is a common occurrence in the world's languages, where an experiencer subject gets marked as a recipient of some kind.